Community Environmental Health Laboratory Eelgrass Monitoring 2013-Present

Occurrence
Latest version published by The Community Environmental Health Laboratory at MDI Biological Laboratory on Apr 11, 2023 The Community Environmental Health Laboratory at MDI Biological Laboratory

Download the latest version of this resource data as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A) or the resource metadata as EML or RTF:

Data as a DwC-A file download 737 records in English (27 KB) - Update frequency: annually
Metadata as an EML file download in English (23 KB)
Metadata as an RTF file download in English (15 KB)

Description

About this project Eelgrass (Zostera marina), a species vital to the health of marine ecosystems is declining across the world. Help researchers track eelgrass populations. Add your reports of eelgrass presence and disappearance to help researchers understand this ecologically important underwater flowering plant! Project goal Help researchers gain a better understanding of eelgrass What participants do: Share observations of eelgrass' presence and disappearance in your local waters. Would you like to help researchers get a better picture of how eelgrass is faring worldwide? What we need to know: Is eelgrass growing in waters near you, or has it disappeared? Do you have photos? (optional) What other background information do you have that might be useful? What is Eelgrass? Eelgrass, or Zostera Marina, is an aquatic grass-like flowering plant that grows mainly in the subtidal zone in shallow coastal waters. Some plants produce tiny flowers in a “spathe”, pollinate under water, and spread by seeds leading to great genetic diversity among the plants. Others spread vegetatively by sending up lateral clonal shoots connected by “rhizomes”, runners that act to anchor the plant to the mud. Why is eelgrass important? Eelgrass is essential habitat for many commercial fish species, and its decline is correlated with the loss of fish stocks and diversity. The leaves are buoyant, rising into the water column, providing an excellent place for juvenile shellfish to attach to at a crucial stage in their life cycles when they need to feed on suspended plankton. By photosynthesizing under water, the plants increase dissolved oxygen. The root structure of eelgrass stabilizes and oxygenates the mud or sandy sediments, allowing invertebrates to settle. Identifying Eelgrass: Eelgrass grows mostly in the subtidal zone, but is sometimes exposed at low tide. Its leaves float up when submerged but lay flat when out of the water, and sometimes especially long blades float at the surface. People often confuse eelgrass with salt marsh grass, Spartina, but unlike eelgrass, that plant is rigid, standing upright out of the water, and is often visible extending above the water at high tide. Some identifying features of eelgrass to look for: Eelgrass leaves are thin, flattened blades. Inner leaves are new growth, older outer leaves begin to decay and fall off throughout the season. Blade length varies depending partially on water depth. The lower portion of the stem is surrounded by a thin sheath. Flowering plants have a spathe with male and female flowers, or may hold ovoid seeds. Flowering plants also have nearly yellow stalks (not all are flowering) The plants are anchored in the sediment with rhizomes, or runners from which other shoots and roots grow.

Data Records

The data in this occurrence resource has been published as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A), which is a standardized format for sharing biodiversity data as a set of one or more data tables. The core data table contains 737 records.

This IPT archives the data and thus serves as the data repository. The data and resource metadata are available for download in the downloads section. The versions table lists other versions of the resource that have been made publicly available and allows tracking changes made to the resource over time.

Versions

The table below shows only published versions of the resource that are publicly accessible.

How to cite

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Disney J, Farrell A, Dorn N, Taylor A, Bailey C, Garretson A (2023). Community Environmental Health Laboratory Eelgrass Monitoring 2013-Present. Version 1.1. The Community Environmental Health Laboratory at MDI Biological Laboratory. Occurrence dataset. https://ipt.gbif.us/resource?r=eelgrass-1&v=1.1

Rights

Researchers should respect the following rights statement:

The publisher and rights holder of this work is The Community Environmental Health Laboratory at MDI Biological Laboratory. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY 4.0) License.

GBIF Registration

This resource has been registered with GBIF, and assigned the following GBIF UUID: 5bdf78d1-01a1-4533-84bc-6f33794ba927.  The Community Environmental Health Laboratory at MDI Biological Laboratory publishes this resource, and is itself registered in GBIF as a data publisher endorsed by U.S. Geological Survey.

Keywords

Occurrence; Observation

Contacts

Jane Disney
  • Originator
  • Point Of Contact
Associate Professor of Environmental Health
MDI Biological Laboratory
159 Old Bar Harbor Rd.
04609 Bar Harbor
ME
US
Anna Farrell
  • Originator
Former Community Environmental Health Laboratory Manager
MDI Biological Institute
159 Old Bar Harbor Rd
Bar Harbor
ME
US
Nathan Dorn
  • Originator
AmeriCorps Environmental Steward
Maine Conservation Corps
Ashley Taylor
  • Originator
  • Point Of Contact
Community Manager
MDI Biological Laboratory
159 Old Bar Harbor Rd.
Bar Harbor
ME
US
Cait Bailey
  • Originator
  • Point Of Contact
Systems Developer
MDI Biological Laboratory
159 Old Bar Harbor Rd.
04609 Bar Harbor
ME
US
Alexis Garretson
  • Metadata Provider
  • Originator
  • USER
  • Point Of Contact
Community Environmental Health Laboratory Manager
MDI Biological Laboratory
159 Old Bar Harbor Rd.
04609 Bar Harbor
ME
US
Community Environmental Health Laboratory
  • Point Of Contact
Community Environmental Health Laboratory
MDI Biological Laboratory
159 Old Bar Harbor Rd.
04609 Bar Harbor
ME
US

Geographic Coverage

Primarily collected in Mount Desert Island, Maine

Bounding Coordinates South West [20.298, -122.761], North East [48.136, -64.297]

Temporal Coverage

Start Date / End Date 2004-05-13 / 2022-10-21

Sampling Methods

What we need to know: Is eelgrass growing in waters near you, or has it disappeared? Do you have photos? (optional) What other background information do you have that might be useful? What is Eelgrass? Eelgrass, or Zostera Marina, is an aquatic grass-like flowering plant that grows mainly in the subtidal zone in shallow coastal waters. Some plants produce tiny flowers in a “spathe”, pollinate under water, and spread by seeds leading to great genetic diversity among the plants. Others spread vegetatively by sending up lateral clonal shoots connected by “rhizomes”, runners that act to anchor the plant to the mud. Why is eelgrass important? Eelgrass is essential habitat for many commercial fish species, and its decline is correlated with the loss of fish stocks and diversity. The leaves are buoyant, rising into the water column, providing an excellent place for juvenile shellfish to attach to at a crucial stage in their life cycles when they need to feed on suspended plankton. By photosynthesizing under water, the plants increase dissolved oxygen. The root structure of eelgrass stabilizes and oxygenates the mud or sandy sediments, allowing invertebrates to settle. Identifying Eelgrass: Eelgrass grows mostly in the subtidal zone, but is sometimes exposed at low tide. Its leaves float up when submerged but lay flat when out of the water, and sometimes especially long blades float at the surface. People often confuse eelgrass with salt marsh grass, Spartina, but unlike eelgrass, that plant is rigid, standing upright out of the water, and is often visible extending above the water at high tide. Some identifying features of eelgrass to look for: Eelgrass leaves are thin, flattened blades. Inner leaves are new growth, older outer leaves begin to decay and fall off throughout the season. Blade length varies depending partially on water depth. The lower portion of the stem is surrounded by a thin sheath. Flowering plants have a spathe with male and female flowers, or may hold ovoid seeds. Flowering plants also have nearly yellow stalks (not all are flowering) The plants are anchored in the sediment with rhizomes, or runners from which other shoots and roots grow.

Study Extent About this project Eelgrass (Zostera marina), a species vital to the health of marine ecosystems is declining across the world. Help researchers track eelgrass populations. Add your reports of eelgrass presence and disappearance to help researchers understand this ecologically important underwater flowering plant! Project goal Help researchers gain a better understanding of eelgrass What participants do: Share observations of eelgrass' presence and disappearance in your local waters.

Method step description:

  1. What we need to know: Is eelgrass growing in waters near you, or has it disappeared? Do you have photos? (optional) What other background information do you have that might be useful? What is Eelgrass? Eelgrass, or Zostera Marina, is an aquatic grass-like flowering plant that grows mainly in the subtidal zone in shallow coastal waters. Some plants produce tiny flowers in a “spathe”, pollinate under water, and spread by seeds leading to great genetic diversity among the plants. Others spread vegetatively by sending up lateral clonal shoots connected by “rhizomes”, runners that act to anchor the plant to the mud. Why is eelgrass important? Eelgrass is essential habitat for many commercial fish species, and its decline is correlated with the loss of fish stocks and diversity. The leaves are buoyant, rising into the water column, providing an excellent place for juvenile shellfish to attach to at a crucial stage in their life cycles when they need to feed on suspended plankton. By photosynthesizing under water, the plants increase dissolved oxygen. The root structure of eelgrass stabilizes and oxygenates the mud or sandy sediments, allowing invertebrates to settle. Identifying Eelgrass: Eelgrass grows mostly in the subtidal zone, but is sometimes exposed at low tide. Its leaves float up when submerged but lay flat when out of the water, and sometimes especially long blades float at the surface. People often confuse eelgrass with salt marsh grass, Spartina, but unlike eelgrass, that plant is rigid, standing upright out of the water, and is often visible extending above the water at high tide. Some identifying features of eelgrass to look for: Eelgrass leaves are thin, flattened blades. Inner leaves are new growth, older outer leaves begin to decay and fall off throughout the season. Blade length varies depending partially on water depth. The lower portion of the stem is surrounded by a thin sheath. Flowering plants have a spathe with male and female flowers, or may hold ovoid seeds. Flowering plants also have nearly yellow stalks (not all are flowering) The plants are anchored in the sediment with rhizomes, or runners from which other shoots and roots grow.

Additional Metadata

Alternative Identifiers 5bdf78d1-01a1-4533-84bc-6f33794ba927
https://ipt.gbif.us/resource?r=eelgrass-1