Monitoring and Managing Ash (MaMA) Lingering Ash Survey- Powered by Anecdata.org

Occurrence
Latest version published by The Community Environmental Health Laboratory at MDI Biological Laboratory on Jan 1, 2023 The Community Environmental Health Laboratory at MDI Biological Laboratory

Download the latest version of this resource data as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A) or the resource metadata as EML or RTF:

Data as a DwC-A file download 193 records in English (10 KB) - Update frequency: not planned
Metadata as an EML file download in English (18 KB)
Metadata as an RTF file download in English (11 KB)

Description

MaMA Lingering Ash Search is one of three Anecdata.orgopen_in_new projects of the Ecological Research Institute’s Monitoring and Managing Ash (MaMA) program, which aims to help prevent ash extinction and mitigate EAB damage (see MonitoringAsh.org). Lingering ash, meeting strict criteria (≥4” DBH, naturally occurring, not chemically treated against EAB, and in particular canopy health classes), can only be found in areas determined to have already reached relevant ash mortality thresholds. These areas are listed at www.MonitoringAsh.org/open_in_new, where there are also instructions on how to use the AvenzaMaps app to determine whether any particular site (including your current location) is in such a search zone. However, “potential lingering ash”, meeting the same criteria as lingering ash, can be reported from any area where the mortality thresholds haven’t been met, but where most of the ash trees are dead or dying from EAB. Finding and reporting lingering ash through this Anecdata.org project will make it possible for the US Forest Service EAB Resistance Breeding Project to obtain twigs from the trees, subject to landowner permission, to help propagate EAB-resistant lines for use in ash conservation and restoration. You should inform landowners of the locations and importance of these trees so they can take steps to protect them from felling. For “potential lingering ash” reported, you will be informed when the area eventually reaches the mortality criteria that make it a lingering ash search zone and then asked to check the trees again to see if they are still healthy and, if they are, to report them as lingering ash. You should inform landowners of the locations and importance of potential lingering ash and encourage them to protect them from felling as long as they are healthy. To do this project, you need to be able to recognize trees as ash (genus Fraxinus), but are not required to be able to distinguish between ash species. However, it is particularly helpful if you can tell blue ash (Fraxinus quadrangulata) from other ash species, and also if you can recognize black ash (Fraxinus nigra). You also need to be able to assess the ash in terms of their canopy health classopen_in_new, recognize open_in_newdefinite evidence of EABopen_in_new, and estimate or measure tree diameter. None of this is particularly difficult, but make sure to train yourself before you begin collecting actual data. All data can be collected and submitted using the Anecdata.org app on a smartphone or tablet or can be submitted via the Anecdata.org website. If not using a smartphone or tablet for data collection, you can download and print a paper data sheet from www.monitoringash.org/lingering-ash-surveysopen_in_new, use a camera to take photos and a GPS unit to record location data. Any questions or comments should be sent to outreach@MonitoringAsh.org. If you are doing a systematic search for lingering or potential lingering ash trees, it is helpful to record your search track on your smartphone using AvenzaMaps or on a GPS unit; then, if you do not find any such trees, you can email your search track and a description of where you searched to outreach@MonitoringAsh.org. This will help prevent wasting repeated search effort on areas where from which these trees are absent. Terms: Dead and dying ash trees can pose hazards of serious injury from falling tree material. Participants agree to assume all risks of injury from these trees and to not hold project developers, directors, managers or funding sources liable for them. Participants should not enter private property without the landowner’s permission. Project questions and other text are copyright ERI 2017, 2018, 2019.

Data Records

The data in this occurrence resource has been published as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A), which is a standardized format for sharing biodiversity data as a set of one or more data tables. The core data table contains 193 records.

1 extension data tables also exist. An extension record supplies extra information about a core record. The number of records in each extension data table is illustrated below.

Occurrence (core)
193
Multimedia 
193

This IPT archives the data and thus serves as the data repository. The data and resource metadata are available for download in the downloads section. The versions table lists other versions of the resource that have been made publicly available and allows tracking changes made to the resource over time.

Versions

The table below shows only published versions of the resource that are publicly accessible.

Rights

Researchers should respect the following rights statement:

The publisher and rights holder of this work is The Community Environmental Health Laboratory at MDI Biological Laboratory. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY 4.0) License.

GBIF Registration

This resource has been registered with GBIF, and assigned the following GBIF UUID: 74827e1b-37f9-4ec8-b53a-d1019489fa52.  The Community Environmental Health Laboratory at MDI Biological Laboratory publishes this resource, and is itself registered in GBIF as a data publisher endorsed by U.S. Geological Survey.

Keywords

Occurrence

Contacts

Radka Wildova
  • Originator
Project Administrator
Anecdata.org
JKtreebreeder
  • Originator
Project Administrator
Anecdata.org
Sarah Madronal
  • Originator
Project Administrator
Anecdata.org
Anecdata.org Contributors
  • Originator
Data Contributors
Anecdata.org
Jane Disney
  • Originator
  • Point Of Contact
Associate Professor of Environmental Health
MDI Biological Laboratory
159 Old Bar Harbor Rd.
04609 Bar Harbor
ME
US
Cait Bailey
  • Originator
  • Point Of Contact
Systems Developer
MDI Biological Laboratory
159 Old Bar Harbor Rd.
04609 Bar Harbor
ME
US
Ashley Taylor
  • Originator
  • Point Of Contact
Community Manager
MDI Biological Laboratory
159 Old Bar Harbor Rd.
04609 Bar Harbor
ME
US
Alexis Garretson
  • Metadata Provider
  • Originator
  • User
  • Point Of Contact
Community Environmental Health Laboratory Manager
MDI Biological Laboratory
159 Old Bar Harbor Rd.
04609 Bar Harbor
ME
US
Anecdata.org
  • Point Of Contact
Anecdata.org
Community Environmental Health Laboratory
  • Point Of Contact
Community Environmental Health Laboratory
MDI Biological Laboratory
159 Old Bar Harbor Rd.
04609 Bar Harbor
ME
US

Geographic Coverage

United States

Bounding Coordinates South West [38.734, -87.959], North East [42.881, -73.935]

Temporal Coverage

Start Date / End Date 2018-09-26 / 2021-08-24

Project Data

Anecdata is a free online citizen science platform developed by the Community Lab at the MDI Biological Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine. Anecdata is used by hundreds of individuals and organizations to gather and access citizen science observations and provides a platform to easily collect, manage, and share their citizen science data. How Anecdata works: Project managers create projects, creating datasheets that participants fill out to share their observations. Participants join projects and use the Anecdata website or mobile app to share their observations with the project. Project data is now available for anyone to view and download!

Title Anecdata.org
Identifier Anecdata.org

The personnel involved in the project:

Cait Bailey
  • Principal Investigator
Ashley Taylor
  • Curator

Sampling Methods

Finding, protecting, and reporting ash trees that are EAB-resistant for use in resistance breeding program.

Study Extent In this project, you report whether you’ve found naturally occurring mature ash still healthy years after emerald ash borer (EAB) has killed almost all an area’s ash (“lingering ash”) or before then, when most of its ash are dying or dead from EAB (“potential lingering ash”). Lingering ash, through grafting and breeding, can yield highly EAB-resistant ash offering great hope for ash conservation. http://www.monitoringash.org

Method step description:

  1. Searching for and reporting healthy, naturally occurring mature ash in areas severely affected by EAB.

Additional Metadata

Alternative Identifiers 74827e1b-37f9-4ec8-b53a-d1019489fa52
https://doi.org/10.15468/jeqj74
https://bison.usgs.gov/ipt/resource?r=mama-ash